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Anthology Galore!

I’ve been a little slow in my announcement of my publications, so I have several exciting projects to tell you about.

In November last year, Fiction River: Last Stand was released with my story “Magic and Sacrifice”. I co-edited that anthology with Dean Wesley Smith and it turned out extremely well. I am so happy with all the stories; they are all great. They all show case different kinds of last stands.

My story takes a lot of inspiration from the battle at Thermopylae. So few spartans, so many enemies. A classic last stand. I narrowed it down to one woman and one man fighting to save their country from invasion of a neighboring country. A high fantasy tale.

I highly recommend every story in this anthology. Dean and I had a blast putting this together. We had so many quality stories to choose from, a real embarrassment of riches. We get to share it in a volume I’m very proud of.

Buy it here (a link that leads you to many of the places the volume is for sale at).

The second release announcement is also a Fiction River, this time called No Humans Allowed edited by John Helfers. An anthology filled with stories told from the point of view of aliens, animals, things and more, but not one story is told from the point of view of a human.

My story is called “The Game of Time” and it is from the point of view of a book, the Book of Time to be more exact. This is also a high fantasy tale and the start of a new fantasy world. The world/series doesn’t have a name yet, but it will.

The story is about what happens when the Book of Time makes a mistake and all the consequences that follow.

There are some really great stories in this volume (beside my own, of course ^_~). You don’t even have to trust just me. Tangent Online did a review of the volume. This is what they said about my story:

“The story is interesting and well written…”  —Tangent Online

Just like above, I have a universal link where you can find most retailers to buy Fiction River: No Humans Allowed.

The last news for today are about another Fiction River anthology that will release at the end of June (so in a couple of days!). This one is called Editor’s Choice and is edited by Mark Leslie. And because publishing isn’t always straight forward, this is actually the first story I sold to Fiction River.

The story is called “The Blood is on the Wall” and is a military horror story. Quite different in some ways from what I normally write. Although since my fantasy tend towards the darker side, perhaps not that different.

It is about a woman who works as a UN soldier while vampires are trying to take over the world. When the story starts the vampires are precariously close to taking over the city where the soldier’s sisters live.

And once again I’ve read more or less all the stories in this volume too and I can’t recommend it enough. I actually recommend all Fiction River volumes if you enjoy quality short fiction and read widely across all genres. If you mostly read one or two genres, comment which ones below and I’ll tell you which volumes has mostly/only those genres.

Fiction River: Editor’s Choice will be available at all the common book retailers in a couple of days.

PS. I’ll have a new installment of Traveling Fictioneer next week, I’ll talk about my visit in Florence.

Visiting Boston — Backpacks, Walks, and Seeing Friends

Last time I told you about Costa Rica, a country that I find it hard to describe, but let me forever changed.

From Costa Rica, I went to Boston to visit for four days and stay at a friend’s home, Paulette. She is a great host, both sharing tasty food, being helpful, and having ideas for many fun activities.

First and foremost, she helped me buy a good camping/hiking backpack. I probably wouldn’t have had the patience to find the one with the right fit without her. Plus the store clerk was extremely helpful and patient too.

Actually, there was a really great second thing too. I now have business cards with my name and traveling fictioneer as my title/work. Plus my website address. Looks great and very simple to design and get.

Three activities from my four days stand out (beside the backpack shopping and business cards). We went out to dinner to meet up with a third friend, Cat. Both Cat and Paulette are people I got to know through a forum and it was great meeting Cat for the first time. (It was great meeting Paulette face to face for the first time my first day in Boston.)

After buying the backpack, it was suggested I go for a five mile hike (basically 8km) to test it out. So Paulette took me to a nearby wooded hill and we walked around there until we hit the five mile mark. Or technically we reached it will walking back from the hill.

Lastly on my last morning in Boston, Paulette and I went canoeing along part of a/the river running through Boston. We were not in the downtown area, instead much further out.

Felicia Fredlund, Traveling Fictioneer, trying on new backpack on 5-mile hike in Boston

Felicia Fredlund, Traveling Fictioneer, trying on new backpack on 5-mile hike in Boston

Microwave mailbox seen on walk in Boston

Microwave mailbox seen on walk in Boston

Evening out with friends in Boston

Evening out with friends in Boston

Gorgeous building seen while canoeing in Boston

Gorgeous building seen while canoeing in Boston

Felicia Fredlund, Traveling Fictioneer, canoeing in Boston

Felicia Fredlund, Traveling Fictioneer, canoeing in Boston

Basically I had a fun visit with a friend before going back to Sweden for about a week. Then my next adventure takes me to Italy. See you there!

Costa Rica — A Country I Find Hard to Describe, but it is Wonderful

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica. Like a post card.

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica. Like a post card.

Last time I told you about the longer than planned journey—or adventure if you will—to get to Costa Rica.

When anyone asks me how Costa Rica was, I never know how to answer. It isn’t because it was ambiguous or a lot of highs and lows. The country, or at least the part I visited, had a strong presence.

I spent the majority of my time in a place called Nosara on the Pacific coast. A place know for its many great yoga retreats, or so I have heard.

Costa Rica is magical. Nature feels extremely close. Heat, humidity, and thunderstorms since I was there during the rain season or possibly partly in the shoulder season going into the rainy season. The point is it rained, and it rained good on some days.

A lot of the houses and hotels looked very isolated because there were trees everywhere. It was like the houses tried to take some space from the jungle, but the jungle was winning.

Considering all the bugs and the howls of the howler monkeys, it was like entering a different world.

Everything felt elemental and close. Powerful in an awesome way.

The lightning was gorgeous.

And so where the sunsets.

Most of the time I spent there, I was in a retreat called Activate Courage, lead by Kate Marolt and Amy Clover. This meant I did daily yoga and bodyweight/bootcamp workouts, and a lot of soul searching, mindset exercises and emotional work.

It was transformational.

My last night in Costa Rica, which I spent in San Jose, I had dinner with one of the people that also went on the unplanned Panama visit I talked about last time. It was a great way to finish off my time there.

I wonder if there are more places where nature feels so close, like it is breathing down your neck, but in a good way.

Using trees as art. Nosara, Costa Rica.

Using trees as art. Nosara, Costa Rica.

Rain in Costa Rica. So beautiful

Rain in Costa Rica. So beautiful

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 1

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 1

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 2

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 2

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 3

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 3

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 4

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 4

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 5

Beach at Nosara, Costa Rica, picture 5

Lizard in Costa Rica

Lizard in Costa Rica

Fabolous ladies on my retreat

Fabolous ladies on my retreat

First meal after a week of vegetarian food

First meal after a week of vegetarian food

Sunset in Nosara, Costa Rica

Sunset in Nosara, Costa Rica

Next time you’ll find me in Boston visiting a friend. See you then!

PS. The anthology Fiction River: No Humans Allowed edited by John Helfers got a review in Tangent Online. This is what they said about my story:

“The story is interesting and well written…”  —Tangent Online

First Flights—What an Adventure!?!?!?

Last time I told you about my first day as a traveling fictioneer, and then a few days later I was finally to leave Sweden.

My first few flights were to take me from Stockholm, Sweden, to San Jose, Costa Rica, via Oslo, Norway, and Newark, USA.

My biggest worry was the tight connection in Oslo. With only 45 minutes between flights, any delay in my first leg could mess up my whole travel plans.

As it turns out I didn’t have to worry. My flight arrived in Oslo in plenty of time and I only had to move a short distance to my next gate.

Easy peasy.

Or so I thought.

The last 30 minutes of the Oslo-Newark leg was very bumpy and I started to feel nauseated.

I got to Newark. Go through immigration and customs because you always have to do that in the USA no matter if you will continue flying to another country. And then I saw the next flight will be at least 45 minutes delayed.

I shrugged. That was fine. This was my last leg. It could be however late it wanted to be as long as it wasn’t cancelled.

Tip for the unwary: don’t jinx yourself like that if you can avoid it.

It was raining buckets in Newark.

In Guatemala, there was a volcano eruption.

The reason for my plane’s delay was because the plane we would use hadn’t arrived yet. The volcano eruption might have had something to do with that.

The 45 minutes delay turned to over an hour before we were finally boarding.

Up into the rainy air we went.

After this everything seemed to go alright. I seem to remember a bit of bumpy air, but not much and not continuous.

Then…

Then the pilot said that we were about an hour from San Jose and the airport was closed due to broken runway lights. (Impossible to land in darkness without them.) We were to go into the holding pattern because the airport thought it could fix the lights in about 45 minutes.

Ten minutes go by and the pilot reported that now the airport was reporting a later opening time and we didn’t have enough fuel so we’d fly to Panama City, Panama, as the nearest big airport to refuel and hopefully fly back when San Jose airport opened.

By now it was getting to be quite late. It was around 21:00 (local Costa Rica time) and our scheduled landing time was 19:15, already two hours behind schedule. It would take another hour to fly to Panama.

So fly we did and landed in Panama around 23:00 local Panama time (new time zone). And the pilot reported again and basically said: the San Jose airport wasn’t sure when it would open and the current flight crew had to stop working in 30 minutes.

Yikes!

And here I thought Oslo would be the problem. Nope nope nope.

I am sure most of you can guess what happens next if you’ve been through or heard about something similar.

Long, long, long queues through customs because more than our plane couldn’t go to San Jose. Then a long, long, long wait for coupons for hotel and meals, and then transport to hotel.

And I happened to be at the back of the bus, so I was almost last in the check in line.

Around 2:40 in the morning was when I finally stepped into my hotel room for a couple of hours of sleep.

We left our checked baggage on the plane, so I only had my handbag which did not contain a change of clothes or anything useful like that. At least I had a toothbrush and toothpaste from my Oslo-Newark flight. (I flew SAS plus, kinda like economy plus.)

The good thing? The hotel was upscale. The bed soft, the shower awesome and the breakfast was delicious.

And I’ve technically checked off Panama as a place to visit. I have after all stepped foot on its soil and I have a stamp in my passport to prove it.

Now, you are thinking that this tale must be at its end. We all got back to the airport the next day, onto the plane and flew merrily to San Jose where I didn’t miss the domestic flight I was taking that day.

You’d be mostly right. In that way that all of the above happened, but another wrench was thrown in the works first which was the thing that finally made me lose my temper.

Because so far I had been pretty zen and I’d consoled calmness because being angry and such wouldn’t make the process faster.

It still wouldn’t, but I think it is fair to say that it isn’t the best idea to test the temper of a large group of people that only had about 2-3 hours of sleep (and many even less than that).

We went to the airport. We went through security. We went to our gate. Supposedly we’d fly at 10:45.

Everyone felt pretty merry. Those I spoke to had managed to make arrangements for anything that changed with getting to San Jose a day late.

And then…

Airport regulations or some sadistic person decided that we couldn’t board until each carry on had been hand searched by one of five people setting up at our gate.

Now, I don’t have a problem with this process. Not really.

Well, they could have done it when we went through security.

Or they could have set it up in such a time frame that we could still leave on time or they could have brought enough people that they could search everything before planned take off.

They did none of those things.

Instead they set up around 10:00 and planned to get through a full plane load of people—so what 150-200 people? I really don’t know—in less than 45 minutes?

Impossible.

This was a US airline, which means that most everyone tried to avoid paying for checking in baggage and therefore had big carry-ons full of stuff. (I guess those people had a change of cloths… how nice…)

It took about an hour and a half.

We finally were in the air at 11:50.

Someone I’d been talking to think this happened to us because of a tip although when asked airport personnel said this was normal procedure. If it was normal and happened to every flight, all things would have been set up in advance and they’d have the routines to prove it. Or more likely they’d do it at security, you know the place where they check your carry-ons.

Plus we already knew it didn’t happen to another flight that left from a nearby gate.

This thing irritated me a lot, especially since the more prudent thing to do would have been to search some random people, not everyone. But then if it was a tip, it really wasn’t specific enough and it wasn’t like any of us had planned to be in Panama so someone would have had to be pretty crafty to set up spontaneous smuggling (or whatever the tip was).

So yes, after being calm and collected the previous day (there really wasn’t anything to do but wait), I got angry about the extra search because it was so clumsily done.

Unnecessary inefficiency bugs me. Airports are generally pretty uneven about efficiency, but there is a dance to it that looks the same more or less everywhere. When they step out of that pattern, it really is on them to make sure it doesn’t delay a flight a whole hour so they could indulge sadism or a tip or whatever.

After this, things went as smoothly as expected. We landed in San Jose at about 11:50 (a one hour flight and time zone shift meant we landed at the same time we took off). Immigration in San Jose took about an hour, maybe slightly less. Then customs for five minutes. On I went to check into my domestic flight, quick through security and I had time for a meal.

So there is the whole story of my first few flights since becoming a traveling fictioneer. The most trouble I’ve ever had.

Night view from hotel room. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Night view from hotel room. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Morning view from hotel room. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Morning view from hotel room. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Street view from outside my hotel. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Street view from outside my hotel. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Street view (other direction) from outside my hotel. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

Street view (other direction) from outside my hotel. Photographic evidence of my visit to Panama, May 2017.

The small plane I was flown in domestically in Costa Rica. May, 2017.

The small plane I was flown in domestically in Costa Rica. May, 2017.

The smallest "airport" I've ever visited. Nosara, Costa Rica. May, 2017.

The smallest “airport” I’ve ever visited. Nosara, Costa Rica. May, 2017.

The smallest "airport" I've ever visited (the rest of the place). Nosara, Costa Rica. May, 2017.

The smallest “airport” I’ve ever visited (the rest of the place). Nosara, Costa Rica. May, 2017.

View out the door of my room in the Blue Spirit Resort. Nosara, Costa Rica. May, 2017.

View out the door of my room in the Blue Spirit Resort. Nosara, Costa Rica. May, 2017.

Next time, I’ll tell you more about my visit in Costa Rica. See you then!

PS. Glad nationaldag, Sverige! Happy independence day, Sweden! (This blog post was posted on June 6, 2017.)

First Day as Traveling Fictioneer

Last time I told you why I am now calling myself a traveling fictioneer.

The house was sold, the adventure could begin but first there was more tasks to do. It is a little hard to sell a house and fly out of the country on the same or the next day.

I didn’t even try.

Instead my first day was spent in my childhood home and I knew the best way to start all this on the right foot (paraphrased Swedish saying):

A nice walk around the lake Judarn in a nature preserve close to my childhood home.

I’ve always thought of that lake and its surroundings as magical. Beautiful nature with a very nice trail around it.

I don’t know that there is much to say about it, instead I suggest you enjoy the photos I took with my phone.

Forest around lake Judarn in Stockholm, Sweden. May 3, 2017.

Forest around lake Judarn in Stockholm, Sweden. May 3, 2017.

Forest around lake Judarn in Stockholm, Sweden. May 3, 2017.

Forest around lake Judarn in Stockholm, Sweden. May 3, 2017.

Forest around lake Judarn in Stockholm, Sweden. May 3, 2017.

Forest around lake Judarn in Stockholm, Sweden. May 3, 2017. Natural framing!

Next you’ll find me… well, not quite where I expected. Until next time!

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